How Does RV Skirting Work?

How Does RV Skirting Work?

How does RV skirting work?

RV skirting keeps the undercarriage of an RV warm by sealing it off from the outside air.

Once the air underneath an RV is contained it can be heated, which is what protects the pipes and tanks.

RV skirting acts like a container for heat.

If you were to put a heater under your RV without any skirting on, there would be no benefit because the heat would blow away.

Is RV skirting worth the cost?

If you full-time in an RV during the winter, think of RV skirting as an investment in peace of mind.

The main issue for RVs in cold temperatures is that the pipes can freeze.

Water expands when it freezes so if there is water inside a pipe that freezes then there’s a good chance it will burst.

And if it’s cold enough for the water to freeze, then it also could mean that the pipes have burst in multiple spots.

Even more frustrating is that calling a plumber for RV repairs is not easy because a lot don’t work on RVs.

Taking your RV to a repair shop is an option, but it’s expensive and a huge hassle if you live in it full time.

Having burst pipes also means living without running water until the repairs are done. 

Installing skirting is the most effective way of protecting your RV.

Why do pipes freeze on an RV?

Most RV’s are not designed for winter living so the pipes are usually either exposed or not insulated enough.

The pipes found in a house are usually well protected, so it’s a lot harder for them to reach freezing temperatures.

Winter living in an RV usually requires a lot of customization and DIY solutions.

What if my RV has an arctic or four season package?

Even with a cold weather upgrade your RV may still be at risk.

That’s because there is no industry standard for RV winter package options so they can vary wildly in quality.

Some can live out the winter with no problems, and others can get frozen pipes despite having an arctic option.

Unless you know someone who has the same model and has gone through a winter with no issues, it can be hard to know if your RV will be able to withstand freezing temperatures.

How does RV skirting prevent pipes from freezing?

RV skirting works by enclosing the air underneath your RV.

Once you have enclosed that air, you can warm it up and the heat won’t dissipate because it’s been contained.

RV skirting acts like a barrier from the cold air outside and a container for the warm air inside.

Is insulated RV skirting worth it?

This is one of the biggest RV skirting misconceptions.

RV skirting does not need to be insulated or have any R-value.

The effectiveness of insulation is measured in R-value.

It’s the measurement for a material’s resistance to heat flow. 

The higher the R-value, the better the material is at blocking the flow of heat.

The issue with R-value and RV skirting is that you don’t need any R-value at all to prevent frozen pipes. 

The most important job of RV skirting is to stop air infiltration.

Air infiltration is the passage of air in or out of an enclosed space.

Stopping air infiltration on an RV is done by sealing off the bottom with skirting.

Once the air is trapped it can be heated.

That heated, contained air is what protects the pipes from freezing.

The main reason why you don’t need R-value for RV skirting is because you don’t need to keep your RV underbelly as warm the interior of the RV. 

No one is living under there, so the temperature doesn’t need to be kept in the 70s.

It just needs to be kept warm enough so that nothing will freeze.

Imagine leaving the windows and doors open in a house in the middle of winter.

It wouldn’t matter how good the insulation is, the house would be freezing because the cold air is coming inside. 

A house can only get warm and stay warm by sealing it off from the air outside.

RV skirting works in the same way.

Once the air is sealed off it can be heated.

Insulated RV skirting, or sometimes called quilted RV skirting, doesn’t provide any meaningful extra protection.

The thickness of insulation found in insulated RV skirting is too thin to make any real difference in R-value.

The job is RV skirting is to stop air infiltration, so to pay extra for insulation that doesn’t do a whole lot is not worth the extra expense.

Now that I have RV skirting, what next?

First, mount the skirting so that there aren’t any large openings or gaps where cold air can get in.

Second, place two temperature controlled heaters at both ends of the RV and set them to just above freezing. 

This way they only turn on and stay on as long as needed to warm things up.

Place them on cookie trays so they aren’t sitting directly on the ground and invest in heaters that have a tip-over safety switch as well.

Does RV skirting have any other benefits?

There are lots of advantages to having skirting. It’s the type of investment that pays for itself in a variety of ways.

Here are just a few of the benefits from having RV skirting:

  • A warmer, more comfortable living space
  • Save money on propane costs

  • Use your tanks all winter

  • Prevent tire dry rot
  • Extra storage
  • Protect pipes from freezing

More comfortable living space

Keeping the underside of your RV above freezing will help keep your RV warmer too.

Sealing off the underside of an RV essentially creates an extra layer of insulation.

Warmer floors and a warmer cabin can make a big difference in comfort during the winter months.

Save money on propane

It goes without saying that because your floor and cabin are kept warmer by skirting, you’ll have to spend less to heat your RV.

Any RVer who’s ever full-timed through an extremely cold winter knows how much propane one family can go through just to stay warm. 

By skirting an RV, that cost can be cut down.

Add that up year after year and it can be a significant savings.

Use your tanks all winter

Some RVers will winterize their rig so they don’t have to worry about frozen pipes.

That involves draining all the pipes and tanks, blowing them out to remove any water and then filling the lines with antifreeze.

It’s a way to guarantee no frozen pipes, but it also means living without running water.

That means frequent trips to get water and lugging it back to the RV, as well as only being able to use the on-site bathroom and shower.

Using RV skirting gives you the freedom to be able to use your tanks all winter.

Prevent RV tire dry rot

Tire dry rot is one of the most common problems for RVers.

It’s when a tire dries out and cracks, making it unsafe to drive on.

Once a tire has dry rot there’s no way to undo it.

Dry rot happens in RV tires for two main reasons:

When tires are exposed to direct sunlight (UV rays) for long periods of time and when tires don’t get moved often enough.

Direct exposure to UV is a major factor for tire degradation.

Having RV tires sitting in direct sunlight for months on end will dry them out and accelerate dry rot. 

Covering tires from harmful UV rays is one of the best ways to prevent dry rot.

If you are skirting your RV, make sure that your skirting covers your tires as well.

This one small step can extend the life of your tires by years.

Moving your tires regularly can also help prevent dry rot. 

Tires are designed to be driven and there are compound resins in a tire that get released when they’re used that keep them pliable. 

If you are using an RV skirting, choose one that can be easily removed and mounted again so that you can periodically move your RV and take it on the road.

This will release those compound resins and keep it flexible.

Having RV skirting that’s easy to remove and remount will make this step a lot easier.

Combining these two preventative measures together, using RV skirting and moving your RV regularly, will help stop tire dry rot in its tracks.

More storage

Space is always an issue with RV living.

By skirting an RV, you now have the entire undercarriage to use as a storage space.

What materials to use for do-it-yourself RV Skirting?

RV skirting is anything that seals off the undercarriage of an RV.

There is no standard type of RV skirting, so a lot of different types of materials can be used.

The most common materials used for do-it-yourself RV skirting are:

  • Rigid foam insulation panels
  • Sheets of plywood
  • Hay bales
  • Snow
  • Vinyl skirting

Rigid Foam Insulation

Using rigid foam insulation boards is one of the most popular choices for RV skirting.

It’s inexpensive, easy to cut and easy to install.

The biggest problem with foam insulation is that the panels are so light they can easily blow off.

They need extra reinforcement to keep them attached.

That’s done by building a frame and then mounting the foam panels to it.

If your RV park has rules about aesthetics you’ll also need to put in some extra work because the insulation panels can be an eyesore on their own.

It’s the type of project that is a lot of work up front and only makes sense if you are staying in one spot for years.

If you see yourself moving at any point in the near future it would likely mean leaving your frame and insulation behind as it would be too big to bring with you.

Plywood

Installing large sheets of plywood is another common option for skirting.

It’s durable, fairly inexpensive and readily available.

Because plywood is heavy, it doesn’t need a frame built for it like foam insulation.

There also isn’t a lot of skill or tools required so it can be mounted quickly and easily.

A lot of home improvement stores will even cut your plywood for free. 

But just like with the foam board, plywood can be unsightly as well and may require extra work to meet RV park standards.

Plywood is extremely heavy, so it’s another option that would only make sense to use if you never planned on moving.

Hay Bales

Hay bales are extremely affordable and insulate well, so a lot of people use them for RV skirting.

However, hay bales aren’t recommended because they have two very large drawbacks.

First, they are a fire hazard.

Hay is extremely flammable.

It doesn’t take much to set it ablaze, and the fire can move from bale to bale quickly making it very dangerous to use as skirting.

Second, hay also attracts vermin.

Using it could mean inviting a mouse infestation and all the issues that come with that.

Hay may be extremely inexpensive, but it’s not worth putting your safety at risk.

Snow

By far the cheapest skirting material you could use is snow.

It’s totally free, and by piling and packing snow around the base of the house it can be an effective skirting.

But it only works if you have enough snow all winter long.

There aren’t a lot of options if the temperature drops to freezing and there’s no snow on the ground.

It’s the kind of solution that works well when everything is the best case scenario, but that’s taking a big risk.

You don’t want to find yourself having to build a makeshift skirting in the freezing cold in the middle of winter.

The money you save by using snow might not be worth the stress and hassle that comes with it.

Vinyl

The best value for price and performance is using vinyl as your skirting.

Vinyl skirting for an RV is the most practical solution because it’s lightweight versatile, and looks great when it’s installed.

It’s easy to customize to fit your RV and terrain, and if you ever plan on moving spots it can be rolled up and brought along for the ride without taking up a lot of space.

There are a lot of varieties of skirting available, with multiple different ways to mount it, so it can be hard to know what is the best choice.

EZ Snap makes the process of buying RV skirting easy.

All you have to do is measure the length of your RV, enter your numbers into the kit size calculator and order the appropriate kit from their website.

Installing EZ Snap is straightforward and can be done in as little as a day.

RV skirting is what will protect your RV from freezing, so think of it as a long term investment that is worth your time and money.

6 Reasons To Skirt Your RV This Winter

6 Reasons To Skirt Your RV This Winter

What’s the best way to keep my RV from freezing?

If you are going to winter in your RV and there is any risk for freezing temperatures, you are going to have to take extra steps to protect your rig.

Specifically, it is your pipes and tanks that will need added protection as they are the most vulnerable during a freeze.

The only exception is if you have an RV that comes with a four season or all weather package option.

These RVs have been modified to be able to withstand colder temperatures with options like enclosed tanks, thicker insulation, double pane windows and more.

However, there is no set industry standard for what makes an RV all weather or four season.

Some are built better than others, which means there are some all weather RVs that are not actually able to withstand freezing temperatures.

Unless you really know what you’re getting, you might not know if your RV was able to survive a cold winter until it was too late.

So even if you have an RV with an all weather package, you still may need to take extra precautions to prevent your rig from freezing.

And if you are like the majority of RV owners and don’t have one made for cold weather, you will definitely need to protect your RV.

If that sounds like you, then there is nothing you can do for your rig that is more important than skirting it before a freeze hits.

Skirting an RV means using a material to seal off the undercarriage.

RV skirts are not something that typically comes with an RV, so it has to be purchased and installed at the discretion of the owner.

If you are undecided about making the leap to get your RV skirted, here are the most important reasons why it’s a wise investment for you:

1: RV Skirting will protect your pipes and tanks

Your RV’s plumbing is what is going to need the most protection in cold weather.

If your pipes are exposed to the elements and the temperature dips below freezing, they are in danger of freezing.

If there’s any water in them they may burst, as water will expand before it freezes solid.

If your pipes burst, it can be very expensive to fix depending on the extent of the damage.

It would also mean going without water until everything was fixed.

Skirting your RV is the best way to protect your pipes and tanks from freezing.

The main function of skirting is to separate the air column underneath your RV.

If you can seal off the air underneath your RV from the air outside, you can warm up the enclosed air and it won’t dissipate.

The easiest and best way to keep things warm inside the skirting enclosure is to have two temperature controlled heaters on either end facing each other (use the kind that has a tip sensor so that if it does fall over, it will automatically shut off).

Also, save some hassle and invest in temperature monitors, so you can always know what the temperature is underneath your RV without having to crawl underneath to check.

2: Stay warmer and more comfortable

It goes without saying, but if the underside of your RV is warmer, the inside will be warmer too.

By keeping that air column under the RV separated and warmer, you gain an extra layer of insulation under the rig.

It works on the same principle as double pane windows.

By separating the air and sealing it off, it creates an air pocket that stops the cold from being transferred.

Your RV stays warmer and so does your floor.

3: Save on propane

A nice byproduct of protecting your RV with skirting is that as your RV stays warmer easier, you will end up spending less on propane.

Most RVs run furnaces on propane and chances are that you or someone you know has spent a winter or two going through propane tanks like water just to stay warm.

Add up enough tanks over the winter and it can get expensive.

Installing skirting will cut that cost down. Add that up over years and it can be a significant savings.

4: You can still use your tanks

If you’ve ever had to carry your own water to your RV multiple times a day, you know how much of a hassle that can be.

Trudging through the snow, carrying heavy jugs of water is not how anyone wants to spend the winter.

If your RV’s undercarriage is kept warm enough then you won’t have to worry about your tanks freezing.

However, there are some alterations that you will need to do to still be able to use your pipes and tanks.

For your water line, you will need to use either a heated hose or apply heat tape and insulation to your current hose.

Your also need to heat and insulate the spigot and any water supply piping as well, as that can freeze too.

 

Your own water connection will need to be heated as well. If it’s on the exterior of the RV then it will need to be insulated and heated.

If you have a wet bay it will need protection as well.

Some RV’s have a warm air duct that goes into the wet bay, which may be all you need.

If you have no such feature, you may want to use a small temperature controlled heater to keep everything from freezing.

The last area that will need to be protected is your sewer line.

Change out your hose, which can become brittle if it gets cold enough, and purchase a PVC pipe.

Heat and insulate the pipe to keep everything moving, and only dump your tank when necessary.

Now you won’t have to worry about making treks through sleet and snow just to use the bathroom.

5: Extra storage

Storage is a premium for any RV full timer, and one of the side benefits of skirting is that you can now use the underbelly of your RV for storage.

If you have a 5th wheel and skirt the hitch area, you instantly create a large storage area that’s perfect for all your summer toys.

If you order the EZ Snap 5th Wheel Hitch enclosure with the zipper door option, getting access to your hitch area is super fast and easy.

6: Tire protection

Something that doesn’t get mentioned enough with RVs is how important it is to protect your tires.

One of the most common problems for RVs that don’t get moved very often is that their tires can get dry rot.

Dry rot is when the tires dry out and crack, making them unsafe.

One of the reasons dry out occurs is because there are compounds in the rubber that get released as the tire is used that keep it supple.

When a tire sits in one spot for an extended period of time and is exposed, it can dry out and reduce it’s lifespan significantly.

However, if a tire is covered and protected from UV and the elements it can slow that process down.

Skirting your RV covers your tires and in the process will help extend their life.

What to use for RV skirting?

The good and bad news is that there are no shortage of RV skirting options available on the market.

This can mean spending a lot of time doing research online and still not know if you’ve picked the right kind of skirting.

And if you want to build your skirting yourself, there’s no real consensus on the best materials to use.

One of the most popular choices is plywood, as it’s fairly inexpensive and sturdy.

It has some drawbacks though.

It’s big and heavy, so it’s the kind of thing you would probably have to leave behind if you were to move your RV to another site.

Some RV campgrounds have rules against using plywood as skirting (as well as other materials, so always double check before committing to any skirting option).

Plywood also doesn’t flex and because it sits right up against the RV, it can scratch the exterior as the RV moves.

Two other common DIY RV Skirting options are hay bales and rigid insulation panels.

These can work depending on your situation, but they both have their flaws.

The hay bales are a serious fire hazard, can attract vermin and are only usable for one season.

Rigid insulation is like plywood in that it can be an effective solution, but because it’s so light it needs to be attached to a frame or it can easily blow away.

The practical solution for most RVers is to buy vinyl skirting.

It’s lightweight, adjustable and portable, so it can be rolled up and taken with you.

There are a lot of different RV vinyl skirting options to choose from.

There are companies that will build you a custom skirt. These are usually made on site, with the RV right there to make sure everything fits just the way it should.

The biggest drawback of these skirts is that they can be very expensive, running into the thousands of dollars.

Turnaround time is also slow, with bookings having to be made months in advance.

The option that offers the best in performance, portability and price is EZ Snap RV Skirting.

Using the RV Skirting calculator that’s on the site, you can quickly find out what size kit you need for your RV and how much it will cost.

The kits ship quickly, so there’s no need to panic if you weren’t prepared for an early winter.

It will fit any make, model or class of RV, Motorhome, Travel Trailer, Airstream and even tiny homes.

EZ Snap is made to be able to be installed by anyone, no matter your skill level.

Because you are doing the installation, you also save significantly on what it would cost for the labor for a custom skirt.

And once winter is over, all you have to do is unsnap it, roll it up and store it away for next year.

No matter which skirting option you choose, remember that it may seem like a large investment, but the cost and hassle of having broken pipes and tanks far outweighs the cost of skirting.

 

EZ Snap Featured In ‘How To Winterize Your RV’ Ebook

EZ Snap Featured In ‘How To Winterize Your RV’ Ebook

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We’re excited to announce that EZ Snap has been profiled in a new eBook called ‘How To Winterize Your RV: The Essential Guide For Winter Living & Winter Storage’.

This is a comprehensive guide that answers all of your questions about what you need to do to make sure your RV is fully protected for winter.

This book is a great resource for anyone who owns an RV, and there are 3 different ways you can get a copy.

It’s available on Amazon for purchase, or, you can get a free copy on the book’s homepage in exchange for a share on Facebook.

What EZ Snap has done is also make this book available for free. Follow this link to download it at the bottom of our RV Skirting page.

Now you can enjoy a worry free winter year after year!

EZ Snap RV Skirting Featured On Keep Your Daydream

EZ Snap RV Skirting Featured On Keep Your Daydream

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Here at EZ Snap we’re big fans of Marc and Tricia from Keep Your Daydream.

They’re a family of five that travel across North America in their RV and chronicle their adventures in videos and blog posts.

Recently, they did a great video full of helpful tips and products for winter camping in an RV and they featured EZ Snap RV Skirting as one of their essential items!

Watch the video to see the big difference EZ Snap RV Skirting made in the temperature underneath their RV.

The Perfect Skirting For Airstreams

The Perfect Skirting For Airstreams

One of the Best Airstream Skirting Options

DIY RV Skirting Solutions.

Airstream owners can rejoice because there is finally a skirting solution that makes sense for them.

One of the most appealing things about an Airstream is the sleek, aluminum body. However, a problem that many Airstream owners encounter in cold weather is finding a way to attach RV skirting. The most common method to attach skirting is by drilling snap studs into the panels, and that is usually the last thing an Airstream owner wants to do to their trailer.

The other problem that comes with custom RV skirting is a hefty price tag and a long wait time.

Some cheap RV skirting options include plywood, bales of hay, or rigid insulation with duct tape. These methods are not usually practical as they do not allow access to the trailers’ sewage shut-off or storage under the Airstream. These cheap RV skirting options are bulky, not easy to move to your next RV site and, in the case of straw bales, can attract vermin.

And the one thing all these cheap RV skirting ideas have in common is that they all turn an Airstream from sleek to eyesore.

Thankfully, EZ Snap has found a solution that makes sense for Airstream owners. Using our patented 3M Fasteners, our EZ Snap® Studs use a VHB adhesive backing that sticks on to your trailer. No drilling required!

Our fasteners will hold our vinyl RV skirting on your Airstream trailer through sub-zero temperatures, rain, snow and wind. 

We ship our RV skirting kits quickly and because of our “Do It Yourself” system, you can have the custom fit you want without the expensive custom price.

You can see from the photos how some of our customers have successfully attached our skirting kits to their Airstreams. Because Airstreams have a fairly low ground clearance, our 30 inch kits have the extra height needed to hold down your skirting using our pipe clamp system.

You can also see how attaching the skirting just below the trim around the length of the trailer gives a seamless look.

Looking at our two photos, you can see two different techniques for skirting around the wheel wells. One customer went over the top of their fender flair trim and one went below the fender flare. Both applications work, it all depends on personal preference.

That’s the beauty of EZ Snap®, it allows you to customize your skirting exactly to your preferences.

Because our proprietary Diamond Weave™ vinyl skirting is a non-fray material, you’re able to cut it to size to fit exactly how you want.

One of the main advantages with using EZ Snap® skirting is not just the low cost, but also the portability. EZ Snap® RV skirting can be easily detached, rolled up,  and stored, if you’re moving from one RV site to another.

So, no more plywood, no more straw bales, and no more holes in your Airstream!

Why You Don’t Need An R-Value For RV Skirting

Why You Don’t Need An R-Value For RV Skirting

There’s a popular myth that RV skirting needs to have R-Value to be able to protect your RV. This is simply not the case.

We’re going to go over the common misconceptions around RV Skirting and R-Value, and what you can do to protect your RV for a fraction of the cost.

1. Any R-Value savings are much smaller the closer the outside temperature is to the inside temperature.
When the temperature dips below zero, the area under an RV is typically kept just above the freezing point by an electric heater. Because of this, the temperature differential between outside and inside air is very small, as is the heated cubic square footage under the RV. This is unlike a house, where inside temperatures are typically kept at 70 degrees or more and where the cubic square footage is about 2500% larger than that of an RV’s.

2. RV skirting would need to be very thick to produce any significant R-Value rating.
R-Value is the resistance to heat flow through a given thickness of material. For example, a typical home in the USA has wall insulation of R-11 to R-15. Your RV Skirting would need to have a sewn-in insulation that is 4 to 5 inches thick to achieve this R-value. Most RV Skirting that claims to be insulated is less than a half an inch thick. At this thickness, there is only the illusion of an R-value.

3. Stopping air movement is 10 times more important than R-Value for RV skirting.
What good is wearing a winter coat if you have the zipper undone? The most important way to retain heat and keep cold air out is a barrier to air-flow (RV Skirting), not insulation. As long as the warm air is contained under the RV and the majority of the cooler outside air is kept out, adding insulation to the skirting is a waste of money. The barrier to airflow created by the skirting is really all that is needed.

4. If you are in an extreme winter climate what is the best way to add R-Value to your skirting?
As mentioned above, the sewn-in variety of insulation (ie: Poly-fill or reflective bubble wrap) adds very little value to RV skirting and is not necessary in 90% of RV skirting projects. The exception to this rule is if the RV is wintering in an extremely cold area where temperatures are commonly 15 degrees or more below freezing. In this situation you will want to have both RV skirting and an insulated barrier of rigid Styrofoam board. Rigid Styrofoam insulation board is by far the most effective way to get a higher R-value without adding a lot of thickness.

Typically this board has an R-value of R5 per inch of thickness. The best variety of this board is extruded polystyrene foam board, also called blue or pink board in the big box stores. To use this board with your skirting, build a frame work under the RV using inexpensive 2” x 2” lumber, then attach the foam board to the framework. Once the foam board is in place, then you can install your RV skirting to seal the warm air in and the cold air out.

5. The best heat source to use under your RV skirting.
In warm climates many RVers use a 100 watt light bulb to create a heat source, but there is a much safer and efficient way to heat the area under your skirting . Use one or two thermostatically controlled space heaters with a built-in fan under the RV. In longer RVs, place a heater at each end of the RV facing the opposite end. Turn the thermostat control to just above the point of freezing. When the temperature dips down close to the freezing point, the heaters come on and blow warm air around the entire area underneath the RV. This is a very safe and efficient heat source, as it is only using energy when needed. Be sure to see the heaters we recommend on the EZ Snap RV skirting product page at https://ezsnapdirect.com/products/rv-skirting/.

New RV Skirting Website

New RV Skirting Website

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Phone & Tablet Friendly.

EZ Snap is proud to announce the official launch of our new, fully responsive website showcasing RV Skirting & Exterior Window Shade Kits.

The new site has the latest in internet security, keeping you and your information safe when purchasing from our online store. The new web-site can be found at https://ezsnapdirect.com

New site features:

  • Fast-loading
  • Big photos & videos
  • Searchable
  • Secure shopping cart
  • Responsive and Mobile friendly

We are preparing as we roll into the busy Fall RV Skirting season, boosting up inventory of RV Skirting Material and our patented 3M Fasteners.

Orders are already rolling in from all over North America for our best-selling Diamond Weave fabric.

We would appreciate feedback on our new site design. If you are so inclined, have a look around and let us know what you think.

How To Install Your Own RV Skirting Video Now Available

How To Install Your Own RV Skirting Video Now Available

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EZ Snap has recently released a “How to” video on Installing your own RV Skirting.

If you are at all handy or a “Do-it-Yourselfer” DIY type, here is your opportunity to not only get a custom fit RV Skirting, but also save yourself a bundle of money at the same time.

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!

RV Skirting – Step by Step Video shows you how.

This video is designed to show you not only the benefits of installing your own RV Skirting, but also the step by step procedure of doing it. It covers the various tools you will need. You will be surprised to know just how simple it is to install your own RV skirting on your motor-home, trailer or fifth wheel.

The video also covers how to determine the size of the RV skirting kit you will need. Also you will learn how to determine the mounting locations of your fasteners and how to install the fasteners. In addition, you will also learn how to cut your RV skirting to size and fit it to your RV for a custom professional look. The EZ Snap pipe retainment system is also shown. This helps keep your skirting in place in winds and also maintains a nice tight look.

Near the end of the video, there is also a section on installing a fifth wheel enclosure skirt to the front of your 5th wheel. And finally at the end of the video the all-important EZ Snap removal tool is detailed. The Instant RV Skirting zippers that are featured near the end of the video has now been discontinued and replaced by either a sewn in zipper for the fifth-wheel enclosure area or you can use the EZ Snap RV Skirting Gecko Velcro . This Velcro is specially designed to stay stuck stick to the RV skirting through all types of weather conditions.

Winterizing Your RV with RV Skirting

Winterizing Your RV with RV Skirting

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One of the most effective ways to keep your RV from the cold winter winds is RV Skirting.

 

RV skirting provides a barrier between the elements and the area below your RV. The skirting helps contain warm air below your RV, as well as blocking out the cold winter winds. After you have skirted in your RV, or motor home you may want to consider a way of providing extra heat to the area under your RV. In warmer climates, something as simple as a light bulb can provide enough heat to keep the temperature above freezing. In colder climates, you may want to place an electric heater in this space.

 

METHOD ONE – Heat Taping

 

Always, be sure that there is no risk of a fire starting with your heating methods. If you have exposed plumbing, you may want to consider wrapping them with electric heat tape to further prevent against freezing.

 

METHOD TWO – Rigid Styrofoam

 

Another method of increasing your protection against the cold is to place rigid Styrofoam insulation around the area that you are planning to skirt and then installing the RV skirting. The RV skirting covers up and hides the insulation and also creates a further barrier from the cold air.

 

METHOD THREE – RV Skirting

 

Typically adding RV skirting to your motorhome or fifth wheel involves having to hire an upholstery firm to custom make an RV skirting for you. We now have an RV skirting and fifth wheel skirting installation video available on our site that will give you step by step instructions on how to install your own RV Skirting.
CLICK HERE to watch the RV Skirting Installation Video…

 

or contact us for more info: 1-877-439-7627 or [email protected]

 

How to Install Your Own RV Skirting Video